Dataset

Reason: Data not yet published but will be in a year. In the meantime, it should not be shared with unknown parties

5

month(s)

26

day(s)

until file(s) become available

Supporting data for "Climate change, wildlife trade, and the ecophysiological consequences of nocturnal vs. diurnal activity patterns"

dataset
posted on 28.03.2022, 13:47 authored by Pauline Celine Julie DufourPauline Celine Julie Dufour
These dataset cover the four chapters of my PhD entitled "Climate change, wildlife trade, and the ecophysiological consequences of nocturnal vs. diurnal activity patterns."

Dataset for chapter 1 includes: Critical thermal maximum (Ctmax) and Critical thermal minimum (Ctmin) values for 101 lizards (6 species) captured in Hong Kong and South Africa measured during the day and the night.

Dataset for chapter 2 includes: Thermal parameters (thermal preference and tolerance) for 36 lizards (3 species) captured in Hong Kong

Dataset for chapter 3 includes: operative temperature recordings for 6 sites and 4 different microhabitats at each site in the Western Cape, South Africa, as well as corresponding values of thermal tolerance for population of Chondrodactylus bibronii and Trachylepis variegata, at each site

Datasets for chapter 4 includes:
i) Sequences obtained for an 1038-bp of NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 (ND2) for 81 individual Tokay geckos, obtained from local wild populations and TCM shops.
ii) Field sampling sheet recording information (morphometrical and morphological) on Tokay geckos captured around HK
iii) Nitrogen-15 and carbon-13 (d15N and d13C) ratios in ~1mg of the tail tip of wild (41), captive (3), and TCM shops (36) individual Tokay geckos, obtained in Hong Kong
iv) Price (HKD) of a pair dried Tokay geckos purchased in April 2021 in Traditional Chinese Medicine Shops in Hong Kong.


Funding

Climate change implications of nocturnality and resource restriction for ectotherms across latitude

University Grants Committee

Find out more...

ocean park conservation foundation (2020/2021)

History